Controvery over Caucasian Mummies in China

Controvery over Caucasian Mummies in China

by Ian Mosley

It has long been a generally accepted archaeological secret that many of the original settlers of Asia were White. Now all of a sudden the Chinese government is getting antsy about the subject.

The U. K. Independent (again, no American media will touch the story) reports: “For her advanced years, she looks remarkable. Despite nearing the ripe old age of 4,000, long eyelashes still frame her half-open eyes and hair tumbles down to her remarkably well-preserved shoulders. But the opportunity for new audiences in the United States to view the Lady of Tarim – a near perfectly preserved mummy from an inhospitable part of western China – has been dealt a blow after it was pulled from an exhibition following a sudden call from the Chinese authorities on the eve of opening. The reason for pulling the mummy and other artefacts from the show remained unclear yesterday (Chinese officials were on New Year holiday) but there were suggestions that the realities of modern Chinese politics may have had a part to play. The mummy was recovered from China’s Tarim Basin, in Xinjiang province. But her Caucasian features raised the prospect that the region’s inhabitants were European settlers. It raises the question about who first settled in Xinjiang and for how long the oil-rich region has been part of China. The questions are important – most notably for the Chinese authorities who face an intermittent separatist movement of nationalist Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking Muslim people who number nine million in Xinjiang.”

These aren’t the first Caucasian mummies found in China. There were five thousand year old mummies with finely woven clothes, who were found. This raises the question of how much technology was transferred to China thousands of years ago by White travelers.

The article notes “The government-approved story of China’s first contact with the West dates back to 200 BC when China’s emperor Wu Di wanted to establish an alliance with the West against the marauding Huns, then based in Mongolia. However, the discovery of the mummies suggests that Caucasians were settled in a part of China thousands of years before Wu Di: the notion that they arrived in Xinjiang before the first East Asians is truly explosive. Xinjiang is dominated by the Uighurs, who resent what they see as intrusion by the Han Chinese. The tensions which have spilled over into violent clashes in recent years. Whatever the reason for the Chinese decision, it has caused great disappointment at the Pennsylvania museum where the ‘Secrets of the Silk Road’ were due to go on show after successful exhibitions in California and Texas without major repercussions”

Essentially, it is an embarrassing but increasingly accepted fact that White people settled many parts of the world first. Kennewick Man is well-known, predating the Indians by thousands of years. There were even red-headed settlers, who sailed to Easter Island. This is an historical and archaeological secret that no one in power under political correctness wishes to admit.

These prehistoric and highly civilized White people have come to be known as Solutreans, after a specific kind of spear point found in the Solutre region of France, dating from almost 40,000 years ago. The Chinese mummies in question were found wearing Celtic ornamentation and what appears to be an early form of tartan cloth.

Solutreans are also believed to have discovered America prior to the Indians, an historic conclusion so politically incorrect that the Discovery Channel was recently pressured into taking the DVD version of its film Ice Age Columbus: Who Were The First Americans? off the direct sales market.

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