Saudi Arabia surrounded by riots in Yemen, Jordan, Iran, Bahrain and more

Bloodbath in Libya, while Bahrain’s government backs down

Saudi Arabia surrounded by riots in Yemen, Jordan, Iran, Bahrain and more

Bloodbath in Libya, while Bahrain’s government backs down


Libya <font size=-2>(Source: CIA Fact Book)</font>
Libya (Source: CIA Fact Book)

Government armed forced pursued a violent crackdown on unarmed demonstrators in eastern portion of Libya on Saturday, especially in Genghazi, Bayda and Tobruk. According to the Arab Monitor, long convoys of military vehicles went into eastern regions and fired on demonstrators with high powered weapons. The death toll may be well over 100, although exact numbers cannot be confirmed.

Bahrain’s royal family bowed to international pressure on Saturday and pulled its tanks out of Pearl Square in Manama, the capital city, allowing the protesters to continue their peaceful demonstrations.

Riots and demonstrations have been spreading throughout the Mideast. A country-by-country summary by CNN summarizes protests in the following countries: Libya, Yemen, Iran, Egypt, Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Djibouti, Algeria, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, and Palestinian territories.

There have been no major riots in Saudi Arabia, mainly because of the country’s vast oil wealth, according to the NY Times. However, the Saudis are feeling increasingly isolated and concerned, according to the article, and fear that the United States may no longer be a reliable backer.

I heard something of a joke on the BBC on Saturday, interviewing an analyst talking about all the demonstrations in the Mideast:

 

ANALYST: You know, I really wonder what George Bush thinks about everything that’s going on.INTERVIEWER: Well, he probably would say that this is exactly what he wanted — to start from the war in Iraq, and see democracy spread throughout the Middle East.

ANALYST: Then he simply should have raised food prices.

Good point. It’s somewhat romantic to claim that all of this unrest comes from a desire for liberty and freedom beating in the hearts of the oppressed masses, but it’s much more likely that it comes from a desire to feed their families, as food prices continue at historically high levels.

(Comments: For reader comments, questions and discussion, see the 20-Feb-11 News — Bloodbath in Libya, while Bahrain’s government backs down thread of the Generational Dynamics forum. Comments may be posted anonymously.) (20-Feb-2011) Permanent Link

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