The Day the EBT Cards Run Out

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“The Day the EBT Cards Run Out”: A Glimpse of the Chaos from Clayton County

The Reality of Clayton County, again.

The Black Undertow: Best Represented in Clayton County, Georgia

We write about that wonderful county located in Metro-Atlanta a lot here. Whether it is a Black sheriff firing all the white police officers and putting Black snipers on the roof as they are marched out, humiliated in the process; whether it is the first county in America in 40 years to lose its academic accreditation; whether it is the county in all of Georgia with the lowest property value (and some of the worst academic test scores by the children who live there), highest foreclosure rates, and highest rates of crime; or whether it is the city that now gives us a glimpse of the impending “DAY THE EBT CARDS RUN OUT”, Clayton County is just the gift that keeps on giving.

The overwhelming majority of Clayton County is Black, with nearly every elementary, middle and high school in the county providing free lunches to Black students whose parents – okay, parent – lack the financial acumen to provide monetary assistance to their children and feed them, themselves, on their own dime.

White people have fled Clayton County. In 1980, they represented 91 percent of the population. They built an economic infrastructure out of nothing, only to see it erode once they fled from the Black Undertow pouring in from Atlanta:

Between 2000 and 2009, Clayton County had a significant change in its racial and ethnic composition, a much greater change than experienced by the state. The county’s African-American population rose 9.9 percent, and its Hispanic population rose 4.8 percent to make-up 62.1 and 12.2 percent of Clayton County’s entire population, respectively. The county’s White population declined 11.0 percent, and in 2009 comprised 30.4 percent of the county’s total population.

Clayton County offers the most stunning visual proof of what happens when white flight meets the Black Undertow; once thriving schools become academically inept, because the students who made those schools academically thrive are gone, their parents moving them to safer cities; the business infrastructure collapses – sustained by the purchasing power of white people who made the county economically viable and attractive to big box stores and business investments – and ultimately replaced with empty strip malls replete with dollar stores, nail and hair salons, and payday loan stores. That is the economy of the Black Undertow.

Here is the story that signifies all that Clayton County became, courtesy of The New York Times:

On his first day at work, the new sheriff of Clayton County called 27 employees into his office on Monday, fired them and had snipers stand guard on the roof as they were escorted out the door.

A judge on Tuesday ordered him to rehire the employees.

The sheriff, Victor Hill, 39, defended the firings and said he had the right to shake up the department in whatever way he felt necessary.

Sheriff Hill also said it was necessary to fire the workers the way he did, including taking some deputies home in vans normally used to transport prisoners because the deputies were barred from using county cars.

Sheriff Hill was among a spate of black candidates elected last year in the county, which was once dominated by rural whites. The fired employees included four of the highest-ranking officers, all of them white. Sheriff Hill told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution that their replacements would be black.

That was in 2006.

Clayton County is a reflection of what Black people are capable of… destroying. The Black Undertow obliterated a once thriving county in a matter of two decades. As of 2009, 25 percent of Black people in Clayton County were on EBT/Food Stamps, not to mention that almost every school in the county provides free lunches to the predominately Black student body.  Indeed, all of Metro Atlanta has counties where more than 20 percent of the Black population (in some cases, 40 percent) are sustained via EBT cards.

An image we will see on The Day the EBT Cards Run Out; Clayton County provides a glimpse

And then, something happened in Clayton County earlier this week that offers us that tiny glimpse of the pandemonium that will soon ensue across the entire nation when EBT/Food Stamps no longer work:

Anger and frustration from dozens of Clayton County parents who say their children are going hungry after their food stamps were suddenly cut off.

State officials admit that something went wrong down in Clayton County at the office that administers food stamps and Medicaid but they’re still not sure what.

Parents say they can’t buy food without those food stamps.

Terry Clark says she stood in line for more than six hours at Clayton County’s Human Services Office because food stamp help for her six children unexpectedly ended.

“There’s no telling my kids we can’t eat. I’m not taking no. We don’t deserve that. Nobody should go hungry here in Georgia,” said Terry Clark.

State officials say the office was overwhelmed Tuesday with dozens of families facing a similar problem. The food stamps are just not there.

“Me and my kids they haven’t ate since this morning. I was supposed to get my food stamps yesterday and I got nothing,” said a mother.

A state spokesperson says what happened was out of the ordinary and unexpected but she said they don’t know yet what went wrong — what was the glitch that lead to this mess?

“Our budgets have not been increased, they’ve been decreased,” said one official.

The office director admitted there were problems as he tried to calm fears.

In a statement, a state spokesperson says, “We have both state and county staff working to understand the cause of the problem today. We are working to ensure people receive their food stamps as soon as possible.”
“I’m a cancer patient. I need these pills to survive,” said Candace Bennett.

Candace Bennett says her cancer medications have nearly run out and after spending all day at the office. Her Medicaid and her food stamps are both still on hold.

State officials say that the Clayton County office was closed Monday because of furloughs and that could have contributed to the lines. They are investigating whether some sort of paperwork or computer problem might have lead to some families getting their benefits cut off by mistake.

In 2010, Atlanta had a Section 8 voucher riot. 30,000 Black people rioted for the chance to sign up for Section 8 vouchers that won’t be available for five -to- seven years. We learned in the tragic Brittney Watts story that all of the violent crime in Atlanta is monopolized by Black people; the same can be said of virtually all of the surrounding counties.

Atlanta Public Schools (APS) has just had a hilarious Black cheating scandal exposed that the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce tried to help cover up, because they know new businesses will not want to move into the city if accreditation is lost. Where will these new investors in the city too busy to hate send their children? A school run by cheating Black teachers, trying to help academically inept Black students meet the standards set by their white counterparts in the lily-white (peaceful) suburbs?

Atlanta will be the city where Black-Run America (BRA) dies. The Day the EBT Cards no longer work… Clayton County has given us a glimpse, just a glimpse of the anger that will appear. All across this country exist counties where a majority or near majority of Black people subsist on EBT Cards/ Food Stamps.

Dallas, Memphis, Detroit, St. Louis, Chicago, Milwaukee, Nashville, Birmingham, Mobile, Cincinnati, Portland, Seattle, Denver, Houston, Baltimore, Washington D.C., Atlanta, Orlando, Columbia, Charlotte, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Indianapolis, Minneapolis… all with populations of people who subsist on EBT/Food Stamps. The Day the EBT Card no longer provides free food to a certain segment of the population that believes it is their right, their duty to continue receiving welfare and other amenities from the government, is the moment the experiment of BRA officially ends.

Again, a once thriving county in Georgia (when it was white) offers a glimpse of the future for those cities, towns, and counties that allow the Black Undertow to take over. White Flight happens first; commerce and business investments next; and you are left with Black people in control of every level of government, courts, police, the schools, and the Chamber of Commerce.

The Reality of Clayton County is the reality of the power of the Black Undertow. White people can continue building new cities out of the wilderness, but they will inevitably be abandoned when it is no longer feasible to raise children in a healthy, crime-free environment.

3 thoughts on “The Day the EBT Cards Run Out

  1. I’ve been living in Clayton County for four years now. I use to visit this place during summmer/winter breaks btwn. ’02-05 and moved here for grad school(SCAD-Atl, hate it!) in ’07. I’ve been fighting to get out every since ’08.
    Listen, I’m a black male, 28 years old, and find your website to be a huge slap in the face, wake up call. I’ve watched the incidents play out over the years here. And it just gets worse and worse. In my perspective complete chaos is going to break out in Clay Co by 2012. It’s on the brim of “Carnival” at this point and it’s like everybody is just laughing (local residents and people in other counties/states) at the mayhem thus far.
    This place is crazy. I’ve never experienced such a large number of people(blk. and white) willing to go out of thier way to create maddness. I promise you, with the behavior that’s taking place out here, this place is going to make national news is a very, very big way. It’s going to result to “Carnival”.

    • I’m very happy that there are some blacks who see what is happening, it saddens me that the vast majority do not. Its one of the greatest failures of western culture and a realization of universal facts in the same moment.

      Stay Safe, that’s all you can do, stay out of their way, and don’t make things worse, you can try and help others see the light but from my own experience if they have not already, they will not.

      Good Luck To You.

      Locust

  2. Everybody here lives in complete fear of each other. It’s like people here let thier imaginations run away with them and make up tall tales and inflamitory assumptions about people they find different (and when I say different I mean in the slightest bit) from themselves.Every time I meet someone who is not from here our first conversation is about what we’ve experienced since being here. And I’ve met a lot of different people(different accentts,race, age,sex, etc., etc.,) out here..But all out of towners say the same thing. “I’VE GOT TO GET ME/MY FAMILY OUTTA HERE!!!

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