Freedom Failed: The New Orleans Black Crime Wave

Freedom Failed: The New Orleans Black Crime Wave

http://stuffblackpeopledontlike.blogspot.com/

PK note: There will be two posts today. I’m in a vendetta kind-of-mood. Next week you’ll get The Walking Dead/Atlanta piece and a big article on why The Hunger Games is a vital book for understanding the world we live in now. I’d argue that the world of Black-Run America (BRA) is far worse than the one Katniss Everdeen encounters in District 12. Thanks to each of you for helping make this week a big one at SBPDL. The comments have been excellent. Again, this site continues to grow because of you, the reader.  I say it repeatedly, but this site started as a joke… it’s important to laugh, but for me the joke is over (The Walking Dead piece will prove that point with an exclamation mark). 


Next week the cover for SBPDL Episode II will be unveiled. No more talk of next week: let’s roll.

We already know that the United States Military utilizes Baltimore and Cincinnati for training trauma response teams, emergency personnel, and doctors who are about to be deployed to war zones across the world. The bellicose nature of The Black Undertow (mind you,the Black crime rate was just as bad in 1921 as it is now) provides these trauma units with an experience that the “real” war zones can’t replicate. Understand that the lethal combination of Black-Run America (BRA) – which makes it impossible to hold Black people accountable for their actions, because they point to the “legacy of slavery” as the source of all their problems – and a desire in the Black community to protect Black criminals in their midst through no snitching campaigns will doom any hope of ever turning dying cities into a Green City.

Why wasn’t this movie released in theaters?

It was Hurricane Katrina that ripped apart every lie promulgated by Disingenuous White Liberals (DWLs) and Crusading White Pedagogues (CWP) regarding racial matters. It is a testament to the power of DWLs and CWPs that the reality of what transpired in New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina has been brushed neatly under the rug. But it’s important to understand that that rug is already bursting with other Hate Facts that have a tendency to come bursting out when they are least desired.

New Orleans of 2011 is a war zone. It’s a war zone because the citizens of the Black Undertow in a city with the mantra “Laissez les bons temps roule” have been granted unlimited freedom, because people are fearful of the consequences that would accompany pointing out the obvious: New Orleans doesn’t have a crime problem; New Orleans has a Black problem.

 Across the nation, affluent Black people are escaping migrating away from citizens of The Black Undertow, just as white people have been doing for years. Regardless of the city, what is left behind is a facsimile of New Orleans.

If you’ve noticed, Freedom Failed has become a new theme here. You didn’t have to be inside the Super Dome in New Orleans back in September of 2005 to realize the truth of this statement. Every citizen of New Orleans had the freedom to leave the city before the hurricane hit; it was those who failed in exercising that freedom who turned New Orleans into an even more lawless version of its self.

Black crime has always been bad in New Orleans, but the recent outbreak of violence has shocked the editors at The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times. For anyone who views WorldStarHipHop, you know this outbreak of violence is celebrated in the Black community, videotaped, and uploaded for the world to see.

So what’s happening in New Orleans that has fine folks at The New York Times shocked?:

Of all the challenges facing the city of New Orleans, none is as urgent or as relentlessly grim as the city’s homicide rate. It was measured at 10 times the national average in 2010, long before shootings on Halloween night in the crowded French Quarter revealed to a larger public what was going on in poor neighborhoods around the city every week. There were 51 homicides per 100,000 residents here last year, compared with less than 7 per 100,000 in New York or 23 in similar-size Oakland, Calif. 

“From September of last year to February of this year,” said Mayor Mitch Landrieu in a recent speech, after reciting a litany of killings from one city high school, “a student attending John McDonogh was more likely to be killed than a soldier in Afghanistan.” 

New Orleans has long been a violent town; in 1994, there were 421 killings here, one of which was a hit ordered by a police officer. With federal intervention, the homicide rate dropped precipitously but began rising again around 2000 and has been fluctuating since Hurricane Katrina. The killers and their victims are overwhelmingly young black men, according to an analysis of homicide cases by outside experts last March, and sponsored by the federal Bureau of Justice Assistance. As police officials frequently point out to the anger of some families, most victims and offenders had prior contacts with the police, often for violent crimes. Less than a quarter were listed as having a steady job. 

The narrower causes are less clear. There are no large organized gangs in town, nor are there major drug wars, though some killings are turf disputes over the drug market, made worse by the drastic reshuffling of the urban poor after Hurricane Katrina and the demolition of public housing projects. 

Many killings in New Orleans are a result of conflicts and vendettas among small, loosely organized groups, the analysis concluded, but in nearly half the cases, the experts listed the primary motive as uncertain or unknown. Only about half the homicide cases are cleared. 

City officials have been pushing what they call a public health approach, a “paradigm shift,” they say, in a city that has been known for soaring arrest and incarceration rates.

Back in 1921, the Black homicide rate in New Orleans was 46.7 per 100,000. Not much changes, does it? What would a paradigm shift look like? Have the New Orleans Saints play a game every day (during the run to the Super Bowl title in 2010, there were no murders during their games!)?

So even during the evil days of Jim Crow, Black people made the streets of New Orleans unsafe. Almost 100 years later, not much has changed.

Douglas McCollam of The Wall Street Journal shares with us this information:

The violence left New Orleans Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas strapped to the hot seat. Appointed by Mayor Mitch Landrieu in May of 2010, Mr. Serpas—the former police chief of Nashville, Tenn.—came into office vowing to stem a tide of violent crime and reform what he called “one of the most dysfunctional police departments in American history.” In Mr. Serpas’s first 18 months more than 60 officers have been fired or have resigned under investigation, including members of the department’s top brass. Overall, nearly 200 officers have left for a variety of reasons. (PK NOTE: Nashville has a horrible Black crime problem, which Serpas worked to cover up)

Over the same period, the city’s murder rate has risen. As of this week, 164 homicides have been committed in New Orleans in 2011, on pace to eclipse last year’s total of 172. To put that number in perspective, New York City, with more than 20 times the population of New Orleans, had 536 murders last year. If New York had New Orleans’s homicide rate, more than 4,000 people would have been murdered there last year, about 11 every day.

In response to public outcry over the bloodshed, Mr. Serpas has offered a plethora of reform ideas. His public statements are peppered with references to his 65-point plan to remake the department, the adoption of crime-interdiction strategies such as Project Safe Neighborhoods, and enhanced community policing efforts to help repair the police department’s tattered image. 

In March, the Justice Department (which is negotiating a consent decree regarding court supervision of the New Orleans Police Department) released an analysis of the city’s crime problem that did contain some insights. Contrary to popular perception, it found that New Orleans’ overall crime rate—including its rate of violent crime—is lower than that of other cities of comparable size. It’s even lower than the crime rate in such family-friendly destinations as Orlando, Fla. (PK NOTE: what a coincidence, the Black Undertow in Orlando is more criminal than New Orleans)

But that news comes with a giant caveat: The Big Easy’s homicide rate (52 homicides per 100,000 residents) is 10 times higher than the national average and almost five times that of other cities of its size. 

Why is the city such a murder outlier? In many jurisdictions, the Justice Department notes, gangs and drugs are principal drivers of the murder rate. Not so in New Orleans, which has comparatively little gang activity or organized violence related to the drug trade. Nor do the killings tend to happen in back alleys or vacant buildings as they often do in other places. More often they occur in residential neighborhoods in close proximity to witnesses. And more often the motivation is not random robbery, but revenge or argument. 

In short, the killing in New Orleans is personal. “What appear to be different about homicides in New Orleans are the circumstances of the events,” Justice Department investigators noted. “In reading the narratives of the offenses, one is struck by their ordinariness—arguments and disputes that escalate into homicide.”

Wait, isn’t New Orleans the same city that a Department of Justice study found that too many Black people are being arrested? Why yes it is. The DoJ has made a consent decree with the city in an effort to bring about massive reforms, such as these:

The U.S. Department of Justice issued a 115-page report last March outlining what it sees as systemic problems within the NOPD. The findings will be the basis of the federal consent decree that city officials will soon begin negotiating. The report concluded New Orleans police:

  • Use too much force against civilians, often don’t report it and, when it is reported, too often fail to investigate the incidents thoroughly.
  • Stop, search and arrest civilians without sufficient cause.
  • Disproportionately arrest African-Americans compared with white residents.
  • Fail to sufficiently engage and police the city’s Latino and Vietnamese communities.
  • Discriminate against women by failing to properly investigate sexual assaults and domestic violence.
  • Have subpar recruitment and training programs.
  • Use a paid detail system that is a potentially corrupting influence.
  • Inconsistently discipline officers, while conducting inadequate internal investigations.
  • Fail to sufficiently embrace community-policing strategies.

Why won’t white people commit crime in New Orleans? Can’t some of the criminality found in The Big Easy be redistributed – like tax dollars are – from the Black community to the white community?

Steve Sailer also noted that the Obama Administration issued a report that noted the unpleasant nature that all 27 instances of police using deadly force in New Orleans in the past few years was on Black people:

From WWLTV:
The [Department of Justice Civil Rights Division’s] report found from 2009 to 2010 all 27 incidents of NOPD deadly force were against African Americans, and in 2009 the department arrested 500 black and 8 white males under age of 17, which diverges “severely” from national data.

Disparate impact, I tell you!

In 2000 (the most recent data I can find), the NOPD was 51% black. I can’t find anything in the Obama Administration’s report on the racial identity of these NOPD police officers they are criticizing. That seems like a bit of an omission for a Civil Rights Division report, no? How often does that division forget to mention the racial makeup of an organization they are criticizing?

Back in 2009, McCollam was high on the prospects of turning New Orleans into the Portland of the South for Stuff White People Like (SWPL) white people:

The Saints’ arrival in a refurbished Superdome in the fall of 2006 marked a symbolic resurrection for the team and the city. Since then an unmistakable halo of optimism has hovered over both. The city’s population has rebounded to about three-fourths of its pre-storm level. And after decades of losing its best and brightest to the wider world, the city’s brain drain has become a brain gain. Dedicated 20 and 30-somethings from around the country are showing up in force, in part to aid with the still ongoing rebuilding effort, but drawn also because New Orleans, in its post-Katrina incarnation, has become something of a testing lab for new ideas. 

In the battered Ninth Ward, hot young architects work with groups such as Brad Pitt’s Make It Right Foundation to build ecofriendly housing. Teach For America and other organizations have taken over large swaths of the derelict school system, helping push it to the forefront of America’s charter-school movement. Tax incentives and an arts-friendly environment have turned the city into a Hollywood hub, with more than 40 films shot in New Orleans in the past two years. Recently, TV auteur David Simon began filming his upcoming HBO series “Treme” around town, a show focusing on the lives of New Orleans musicians after Katrina.

Why is America dying? Why are our major cities in need of Jack Kemp approved enterprise zones? Because people are afraid to shop there, which means businesses are uninterested in investing capital for building new stores in places like New Orleans. All of this is due to Black Undertow.

Worse, the Department of Justice is going after cities where too many Black people are being arrested (though FBI stats for 2010 show that 53 percent of known murders were committed by Black people, who represent only 13 percent of the population).


City Journal published this about New Orleans, which underscores why so many consumers are now using online shopping outlets — because they don’t want to drive into shopping centers, outdoor malls, etc., that are also frequented by the Black Undertow:

Day in and day out, Katrina or no Katrina, New Orleans is America’s most dangerous city. But the numbers don’t tell the whole story. White and black residents, rich and poor, of good neighborhoods and bad, are afraid to go out at night beyond the clear boundaries of well-patrolled areas like the heart of the French Quarter—and night means 6:00 pm, not 2:00 am. Everyone in New Orleans knows someone who has been violently mugged—and everyone knows someone who knows someone who has been violently killed.

The violence is often random but never surprising: a young mother and her seven-year-old daughter shot to death in their home. A 90-year-old former school principal, the widow of the former chancellor of Southern University, and her adult daughter shot and stabbed to death in their home. A Vietnamese immigrant murdered in her grocery store. A middle-aged craftsman shot to death and burned in his home. A young, mentally impaired man shot as target practice in a housing project. A tourist bludgeoned to death near his business-district hotel.

Freedom failed.

There’s a movie I’ve been dying to see called Sinners and Saints about a white cop and his struggles during Hurricane Katrina. It’s my belief the producers of the film can’t find a studio to release it because the movie depicts some of the truth that DWLs and CWPs like swept under the rug.

Worse, our Department of Justice is actively trying to place more yes-men into police departments across the nation who will work to make a more BRA-friendly organization, undermining the safety of civilians in the process.

The United States of America will have another “Katrina” moment (it is my belief it will be based around EBT Cards/Food Stamps). This time, it won’t be an act of nature that shows us the truth; it will be an act that could have been avoided but one that BRA made inevitable

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