VertigoPolitix on White Privilege, White Masculinity, White Ethnic Interests

by The Editors 

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Everything is White Supremacy
White Masculinity and the Awakened Saxon


Ethnic Genetic Interests of Europeans

Ancient Sparta: The First Self-Conscious Ethnostate? Part 1-3: Educating Citizen Soldiers

If in Athens we have ethnopolitical aspects, insofar as the democracy was tempered by Hellenic virtue, in Sparta we have a State wholly dedicated to systematic organization of the society according to a biopolitical ideal. Sparta’s mixed system of government and fiercely communitarian and hierarchical customs were supposed to have been created by the semi-legendary lawgiver Lycurgus, who perhaps lived in the ninth century B.C. Virtually nothing can be said for certain about his life. Lycurgus was, in later ages, rumored to have traveled to Egypt, Ionia, Crete, and even India, where “he talked with the Gymnosophists,”[1] before establishing Sparta’s constitution. What is clear, in any case, is that the basic law and way of life attributed to Lycurgus, and credited for Sparta’s success, were emphatically biopolitical.

Spartan law and culture were obsessed with systematically ensuring good breeding, martial education, and group unity. Spartan ethics and law considered that what was good was whatever was good for the community. During a debate as to whether a commander had abused his authority, the Spartan king Agesilaus argued: “The point to be examined . . . is simply this: has this action been good or bad for Sparta?”[2] Kevin MacDonald has argued that the law instituted by Lycurgus – featuring in-group altruism, relative egalitarianism, separation from and unity in the face of out-groups, specialization in warfare, and communally-determined in-group eugenics – qualifies as a genuine “altruistic group evolutionary strategy.”[3]

Few forms of government have so drawn the admiration of both liberals and ‘totalitarians’ as that of Sparta. Many republicans, both ancient and modern, have been impressed by the Spartans’ ‘mixed’ system of government, with its combination of monarchic, aristocratic, and democratic elements, as conducive to social unity, stability, and the rule of law. The Founding Fathers of the United States sought to emulate the stability of Sparta’s constitution and saw in it a precursor to their own system of checks and balances. Thinkers of a more communitarian bent, such as Rousseau and Hitler, have for their part admired the city for its rigorous organization in service of the community.

The Spartan citizen body was made up of landowning males past the age of 30 who had completed their arduous military training and education. These Spartiates, known as Homoioi (roughly meaning ‘Equals’ or ‘Peers’) made up an uncertain, but no doubt small, percentage of the country’s population. The Helots, Sparta’s large population of agricultural serfs, provided the citizens with the leisure to specialize in military training. These slaves were fellow Greek-speakers although, as non-Dorian Achaeans, there was a certain degree of ethnic difference from the Spartiates. So-called ‘Peripherals’ (perioikoi), foreign residents engaging in various skilled crafts at the service of the Spartans, appear to have regularly accumulated around the Spartan State.

Sparta was presided over by two relatively-weak kings, from two distinct royal families, who served as priests, generals, and occasionally judges. The Ephors, five powerful magistrates elected by all citizens for a non-renewable one-year term, were responsible for implementing decrees and had judicial powers to supervise and prosecute others, including the kings. The most powerful body was the Gerousia, a council made up of the two kings and 28 elders over the age of 60, who were elected for life. The Gerousia set the political agenda, debated issues, and presented the decisions open to the Assembly. The Assembly of Spartan citizens did not propose legislation but could only decide on whatever was presented by the Gerousia. Through these institutions, the Spartan regime sought to reconcile the values of authority, stability, law, aristocracy, seniority, and community. When asked why he did not institute a democracy, Lycurgus is supposed to have answered: “Make your own household a democracy first.”[4]

Spartan society was systematically organized by the regime to achieve social unity and martial prowess. Practically, among the elite Spartiate body of citizens, this meant the encouragement of births, the communal education of children according to an austere and militaristic way of life and living perpetually together through common meals and training. Failure to live up to the city’s demanding standards was harshly punished. Citizenship was not an automatic right, but had to be earned, by passing one’s educational training and paying one’s duties to the mess hall. According to Xenophon, Lycurgus “gave an equal share in the state to all law-abiding citizens, without regard for physical or financial deficiencies. But Lycurgus made it clear that if anyone should shirk the effort required to keep his laws, then he would no longer be considered one of the Equals.”[5]

Following such customs was in Sparta a sacred duty. Not only were Sparta’s institutions and customs attributed to the wise Lycurgus, but these were said to have been approved by Apollo himself. This was significant as the Spartans appear to have been exceptionally pious, regularly engaging in common rituals and sacrifices. Herodotus says that for the Spartans “divine matters took precedence over human ones” (Herodotus, 5.63). Once again, we find religious piety being central to the foundations of custom and the enforcement of group norms. Xenophon also highlights the importance of Spartan religious practice in warfare, saying of their meticulous rituals while on campaign: “if you witnessed this you would think that militarily others are amateurs, whereas Spartans alone are real masters of the craft of war.”[6] Both Xenophon and Plutarch believed that the joint and pious fulfillment of ritual inspires confidence in men before battle.[7]

Spartan politics began with the rearing of children and their education in the martial and communitarian values of their society. Lycurgus is said to have “regarded the upbringing of children as the greatest and noblest responsibility of the legislator.”[8] Young men and women performed sporting events in the nude, so as to encourage both physical fitness and marriages. Lycurgus was emphatic that there was a civic duty to ensure that the next generation of citizens be not only be produced but be the healthiest and best possible. Plutarch reports this while drawing a direct analogy with heredity in animals:

First and foremost Lycurgus considered children to belong not privately to their fathers, but jointly to the city, so that he wanted citizens produced not from random partners, but from the best. Moreover he observed a good deal of stupidity and humbug in others’ rules on these matters. Such people have their bitches and mares mounted by the finest dogs and stallions whose owners they can prevail upon for a favor or fee. But their wives they lock up and guard, claiming the right to produce their children exclusively, though they may be imbeciles, or past their prime, or diseased. They forget that where children are born of poor stock, the first to suffer from their poor condition are those who possess and rear them, while the same applies conversely to the good qualities of those from sound stock.[9]

Past a certain age, single men were severely stigmatized. Lycurgus also believed that “the production of children was the most important duty of free women,” thereby making a fundamental contribution to the society which sustained their freedom.[10] Spartan women were not sedentary and trapped in the family home, as most Greek women were. As their husbands were training constantly away from home, Spartan women were unusual in managing their own households, often becoming wealthy in their own right. These women were discouraged from overeating and encouraged to participate in sports such as wrestling and javelin-throwing on health grounds:

Thereby their children in embryo would make a strong start in strong bodies and would develop better, while the women themselves would also bear their pregnancies with vigor and would meet the challenge of a childbirth in a successful, relaxed way.[11]

It was apparently considered shameful for men to be seen with their wives at Sparta, resulting in sex occurring irregularly while the sex drive remained strong. There was another primitive eugenic rationale behind these measures: young, healthy, active, lustful parents were believed to produce healthier and stronger children. “Puny and deformed” newborns were to thrown into an abyss (or, perhaps more likely, killed through exposure) “considering it better both for itself and the state that the child should die if right from its birth it was poorly endowed for health or strength.”[12]

Lycurgus is supposed to have banned dowries and make-up: “So that none should be left unmarried because of poverty nor any pursued for their wealth, but that each man should study the girl’s character and make his choice on the basis of her good qualities.”[13] His concern with biological quality was so extreme he apparently even allowed for a bizarre official practice of ‘eugenic cuckoldry’ whereby an elderly husband could have children by introducing his wife to “any man whose physique and personality he admired.”[14] Conversely a wifeless man could, if “eager to have remarkable children,” have them “by any fertile and well-bred woman who came to his attention, subject to her husband’s consent.” Plutarch claims that by this measure the Spartans succeeded in “planting in fruitful soil, so to speak, and producing fine children who would be linked to fine ancestors by blood and family.”[15] These measures—so foreign to the contemporary mores of the West—were eugenic and natalist in their objectives. They also emphasize Spartans’ supreme subjection of their personal and familial interests to the public good, ideally up to and including access to their wives! Xenophon, an eyewitness source, claims that by these methods, Sparta gained “men whose size and strength are . . . superior.”[16]

There was an enormous emphasis in Sparta, as in no other Greek city, on the truly systematic education and training of the citizens in order to shape a culture conducive to the public good. Spartan education was communal and austere. The children were taken from their families at age seven and would not complete their training until they were 29. At that point, if the young man had succeeded in this agoge training, he would be made a full citizen. Whereas wealthy Athenians might have a private slave tutor for their children, Spartan children had a single Trainer-in-Chief (a paidomus, literally a “boy-herdsman”) and any citizen could discipline them.

Young Spartans would go barefoot, have a single cloak to wear all year in hot or cold, and would be given a limited amount of food, measures all aimed at making them tougher. Youths were expected to steal from or even murder Helots. The Spartans in general appear to have treated their Helots with extreme cruelty, from humiliation through making them drunk to regular ritualized murder—evidently aimed at keeping this class firmly separate and subservient. Plutarch himself concedes that “there is nothing to match either the freedom of the free man at Sparta or the slavery of the slave.”[17] Montesquieu later would sum up the conflicted feelings of many classical liberals concerning Sparta, saying: “Lycurgus, combining larceny with the spirit of justice, the harshest slavery with extreme liberty, the most atrocious sentiments with the greatest moderation, gave stability to his city.”[18]

We must imagine Sparta as an ordered, hierarchical, and pious state characterized by constant ritual and training, a cross between a military-athletic camp and a monastery. Plutarch says:

Spartiates’ training extended into adulthood, for no one was permitted to live as he pleased. Instead, just as in a camp, so in the city, they followed a prescribed lifestyle and devoted themselves to communal concerns. They viewed themselves absolutely as part of their country, rather than as individuals, and so unless assigned a particular job they would always be observing the boys and giving them useful piece of instruction, or learning themselves from their elders.[19]

Concerning adolescents, Lycurgus “gave orders that even in the streets they should keep both hands inside their cloaks, should proceed in silence, and should not let their gaze wander in any direction, but fix their eyes on the ground before them.”[20] Young adults were encouraged to be competitive in music, sports, and “manly gallantry.”[21] According to Xenophon, this education succeeded: “The result has been that respect and obedience in combination are found to a high degree at Sparta . . . [the system] turns out men who are more disciplined, more respectful, and (when required) more self-controlled.”[22] By his laws, Lycurgus was said to have “done away with prudery, sheltered upbringing, and effeminacy of any kind.”[23]

Go to Part 2.


[1]     Literally “naked wise men,” which is what the Greeks called the Hindu and perhaps Buddhist ascetics they found in India. Plutarch, Life of Lycurgus, 4.

[2]     Xenophon, Hellenica, 5.2.32

[3]     Kevin MacDonald, A People That Shall Dwell Alone: Judaism as a Group Evolutionary Strategy, with Diaspora Peoples (Lincoln, Nebraska: Writers Club, 2002), pp. 8-35, 394-95. Editor’s note: I first got the group strategy idea by writing a chapter on the Spartans for my 1988 book, Social and Personality Development: An Evolutionary Synthesis. 

[4]     Plutarch, Lycurgus, 19.

[5]     Xenophon, Spartan Constitution, 10.

[6]     Xenophon, Constitution, 13.

[7]      The later Greco-Roman writer Polybius went so far as to argue that Rome’s extreme religiosity was what made her constitution “so markedly superior” to other states (Polybius, 6.56). See Guillaume Durocher, “Religious Piety in Sparta & Rome,” Counter-Currents.com, January 18, 2018.

[8]     Plutarch, Lycurgus, 14.

[9]     Ibid., 15.

[10]   Xenophon, Constitution, 1.

[11]   Plutarch, Lycurgus, 14.

[12]   Ibid., 16.

[13]   Plutarch, Sayings of the Spartans, “Lycurgus,” 15.

[14]   Xenophon, Constitution, 1.

[15]   Plutarch, Lycurgus, 15.

[16]   Xenophon, Constitution, 1.

[17]   Plutarch, Lycurgus, 28.

[18]   Montesquieu, The Spirit of the Laws, 4.6.

[19]   Plutarch, Lycurgus, 24.

[20]   Xenophon, Constitution, 3.

[21]   Ibid., 4.

[22]   Ibid., 2.

[23]   Plutarch, Lycurgus, 14.

There is a sense in which all life for Spartan citizens was communal and hierarchical. Even once one had completed the agoge, Spartiates would eat together in common mess halls, again creating common feeling. The ages were mixed, so that the older could teach the young, and citizens were expected to discuss noble deeds. In the gymnasium, the oldest man would supervise, and citizens were expected to train regularly. Xenophon claims that “it would certainly not be easy for anyone to find men healthier or more physically apt than Spartiates.”[1]

Lycurgus reputedly had accompanied his basic law with a land reform giving each of those in the small citizen class an equal property, although economic inequality gradually accumulated over time. A positive consequence of the Spartans’ systematically communal lifestyle was an extremely high degree of trust among citizens. They shared each other’s hunting dogs and horses, the latter being extremely valuable property in those days. Citizens even trusted others to beat their own children if they had done wrong, for “there was a sense in which everyone regarded himself as father, tutor, and commander of each boy.”[2]

The entire society was oriented towards inculcating martial valor and unity. Cowards were severely stigmatized—so much so that they could be beaten freely—and “the citizens considered an honorable death preferable to a life of disgrace.”[3] Citizens were banned from working and instead “all their time was taken up by choral dances, festivals, feasts, hunting expeditions, physical exercise, and conversation.”[4] At the same time, the society’s general frugality meant “there was . . . no need to amass wealth (with all the work and concentration that this entails), since riches were emphatically neither envied nor esteemed.”[5] Music played a large role in Spartan society and their songs dealt with military heroism, sacrifice for Sparta, and the shaming of cowards. The result was an intensely communal ethos:

Altogether [Lycurgus] accustomed citizens to have no desire for a private life, nor knowledge of one, but rather to be like bees, always attached to the community, swarming together around their leader, and almost ecstatic with fervent ambition to devote themselves entirely to their country.[6]

The supreme values of this society are suggested even by their burial practices: “Those who buried a dead person were not permitted to inscribe the name on a grave except in the cases of a man who had died on campaign or a woman who had died in labor.”[7] The dead were buried within the city, so as to habituate the young to their sight.

Sparta was an exceptionally xenophobic society, sharply controlling population movements of both citizens and foreigners so to maintain their unique customs. Xenophon says that “expulsions of foreigners used to occur and absence abroad was not permitted, so that citizens should not be infected by lax habits caught from foreigners.”[8] Iron bars, worthless outside of Sparta, were the only legal currency in the State. Plutarch claims this also led to great benefits: “it was impossible to buy any shoddy foreign goods, and no cargo of merchandise would enter the harbors, no teacher of rhetoric trod Laconian soil, no begging seer, no pimp, no maker of gold or silver ornaments.”[9]

Plutarch says Sparta’s values of patriotism and sacrifice were apparently so ingrained that Spartan women were among their fiercest enforcers. A mother reputedly handed her son a shield as he was leaving for battle saying: “Son, either with this or on this.”[10] There are many stories of Spartan mothers rejoicing that their son died in battle or conversely, if he had returned by fleeing as a coward, killing him herself. Plutarch says:ntly so ingrained in the society that Spartan women were among their fiercest enforcers. As he left to fight and die at Thermopylae, Leonidas is supposed to have told his wife “to marry good men and bear good children.”[12] When Xerxes proposed making Leonidas tyrant of Greece, he is supposed to have responded: “For me, it is better to die for Greece than to be monarch of the people of my race.”[13]

The Spartans were famous for their brief ‘Laconic’ sayings and sharp wit. Plato claimed that the “distinctive kind of Spartan wisdom” was found in “their pithy, memorable sayings” (Protagoras, 343c), which can be recalled easily and thus be borne in mind in our daily lives. Laconic brevity also reflected the Spartan concern with doing well rather than merely speaking or speculating like the verbose Athenians. Lycurgus is supposed to have forbidden his laws from being written because “the guiding principles of most importance for the happiness and excellence of a state would remain securely fixed if they were embedded in citizens’ character and training.”[14] When asked why the Spartans kept their laws on bravery unwritten, a Spartan king is said to have replied: “it’s better for [the youth] to get used to acts of bravery rather than to study written documents.”[15]

A number of Spartan sayings have come down to us, although their precise attributions to various historical figures are probably unreliable. The Spartans, like the Cynic philosopher Diogenes, came to be idealized across the ancient world as an example of perfect virtue and would then tend to be credited with proverbs reflecting this. Nonetheless, the Sayings of the Spartans collected by Plutarch do give us a feeling for the Spartan spirit, as in the following sample:

When asked how anyone could rule the citizens safely without having a bodyguard, [King Agasicles] said: “By ruling them in the way that fathers do their sons.” (Agasicles, 2)

[King Agesilaus] watched a mouse being pulled from its hole by a small boy. When the mouse turned round, bit the hand of its captor and escaped, he pointed this out to those present and said: “When the tiniest creature defends itself like this against aggressors, what ought men to do, do you reckon?” (Agesilaus, 9).

When somebody asked what gain the laws of Lycurgus had brought to Sparta, he  said: “Contempt for pleasures.” (Agesilaus, 20)

To the man who was amazed at how modest his clothes and his meals were, and those of the other Spartans as well, he  said: “Freedom is what we reap from this way of life, my friend. (Agesilaus, 20).

When somebody else asked why Sparta lacked fortification walls, he pointed to the citizens under arms and said: “These are the Spartans’ walls.” (Agesilaus, 29)

As [King Agis] was passing through the Corinthians’ walls and observed their height and strength and great extent, he said: “What women live in this place?” (Agis son of Archidamus, 6)

When asked how one should remain a free man, he said: “By despising death.” (Agis son of Archidamus, 18)

When somebody said that [the philosopher Xenocrates] was a wise man and one of those who search for virtue, [King] Eudamidas said: “And when will he make use of it if he is still searching for it?” (Eudamidas son of Archidamus, 1)

To the stranger who was claiming that among his own citizens he was called a friend of Sparta [King Theopompus] said: “It would be better for you to be called a friend of your fellow citizens rather than a friend of Sparta.” (Theopompus, 2)

When a Persian inquired what type of constitution met with his greatest approval, he said: “Whichever gives brave men and cowards their due.” (Lysander, 11)

When someone was asking why they made the poet Tyrtaeus [an Athenian, whose poems provide some of the only surviving Spartan literature] a citizen, [Panthoidas] said: “So that a foreigner should never be seen as our leader.” (Panthoidas, 3)

When amongst the spoils some people were amazed at the extravagance of the Persians’ clothing, he said: “Better for them to be men of great worth rather than to have possessions of great worth.” (Panthoidas, 5)

When [Governor Pedaritus] observed some effeminate person being nonetheless praised by the citizens for his fairness, he said: “Men who are like women should not be praised nor should women who are like men, unless some necessity forces the woman.” (Pedaritus, 2)

When someone asked [King Charillus] which type of government he considered the best, he said: “The one in which the largest number of citizens are willing to compete with each other in excellence and without civil concord.” (Charillus, 4)

Go to Part 3.


[1]  Xenophon, Constitution, 5.

[2]  Plutarch, Lycurgus, 17.

[3]  Xenophon, Constitution, 9.

[4]  Plutarch, Lycurgus, 24.

[5]        Ibid.

[6]  Ibid., 25.

[7]  Ibid., 27.

[8]        Xenophon, Constitution, 14.

[9]  Plutarch, Lycurgus, 9.

[10] Plutarch, Sayings of Spartan Women, 16.

[11] Plutarch, Lycurgus, 14.

[12] Plutarch, Sayings of the Spartans, “Leonidas,” 2.

[13]      Ibid., 10. Interestingly, many of Plutarch’s Sayings of the Spartans – which may have in fact been attributed in later years – contain expressions of pan-Hellenic patriotism, sentiments generally at odds with the more narrowly self-interested realities of Spartan foreign policy.

[14] Plutarch, Lycurgus, 13.

[15] Plutarch, Sayings of the Spartans, “Zeuxidamus,” 1.

 

The Virtuous Circle of Spartan Power: Discipline Through Lordship

The defining fact of Spartan life was the hard-won conquest of neighboring Messenia in the eighth century and the enslavement of its population as Helots. This victory had launched the virtuous circle of Spartan power. The subjugated Helots provided the Spartan citizen-soldiers with both the leisure and the imperative need to dedicate themselves to martial prowess in the face of a constant threat of rebellion at home. The entire social organization of Sparta came to reflect this state of affairs. Thucydides noted: “most Spartan institutions have always been designed with a view to security against the Helots.”[1]

The system instituted by Lycurgus proved remarkably successful for centuries. The organization and training of the—at their height—around 8,000 Spartan citizen-soldiers to suppress the Helots also translated into international military power, which in turn allowed Sparta to secure allies and thus yet more military power in the Peloponnese. Xenophon opens his account of the Spartan regime saying: “Sparta, despite having one of the lowest populations, had nonetheless clearly become the most powerful and most famous state in Greece.”[2] The unsentimental Thucydides says of Sparta: ‟its system of good order is very ancient and it has never been subject to tyrants. The Spartan constitution has remained unchanged for somewhat over 400 years . . . a source of strength, enabling their political intervention in other states” (Thu., 1.18). Indeed, Sparta was hailed for her lack of civil wars among citizens, a common cause of grief in the Greek world, and for having intervened to liberate other Greek cities from tyrants. Sparta’s oligarchic government seems to have been better than Athens at securing consenting allies among fellow-Greek city-states. The Spartans seem to have been better able at developing stable interpersonal ties with foreign elites,[3]  whereas the Athenian democracy tended to a chauvinism serving her own citizens alone without regard for its imperial subjects. Thucydides has Pericles boast that Athens did not use undependable foreign allies in war but only Athenian residents, implying that Sparta in contrast had the assistance more-or-less consenting allies.[4]

The great successes of Spartan social organization came at a heavy price. The city was devoid of material culture, leaving precious few artifacts in the archaeological record. Even during its heyday, Thucydides observed that Spartan architecture was so unimpressive in comparison with Athens, that “if the city of Sparta were to become deserted, with only the temples and the foundations of buildings left to view, I imagine that with the passage of time future generations would find it very hard to credit its reputed power (Thu., 1.10). Alexander Hamilton wrote that “Sparta was little better than a well-regulated camp.”[5] Sparta is unlikely to have had much intellectual culture either. If there were any Spartan dramatists and philosophers, there is virtually nothing that survives of them. There is little to suggest there was any Spartan equivalent of Athens’ extraordinary theatrical and philosophical achievement, notwithstanding the idealizations and ironic paradoxes of the philosophers.[6] Indeed, the Spartans were said to be “the least intellectual of men” (Aristotle, Rhetoric, 1398b).[7]

Sparta was basically a caste society. Besides the solidary elite citizen body of Spartiates, there were also “fallen” Spartans who had lost their citizenship for reasons of poverty or dishonor, “neo-citizens” who had been naturalized (especially in the later years) to have more soldiers, the working Peripherals who gravitating around the city, and finally the Helots. This appears to have been, somewhat like ancient and medieval India, a largely static society. It was certainly a closed society in which, besides the rigid social order, foreigners were restricted from entry and regularly evicted to prevent the Spartans from being infected with foreign cultural influence. Furthermore, it appears that Sparta’s power in the Peloponnese was based on its ability to retard urban development abroad: rival cities were broken up into villages and placed under the government of Spartan-friendly landowners.[8] Sparta has an air of stagnation, and while the appearance of eternity typically impressed the Ancients, we Moderns tend to feel that that which does not grow is already doomed. At the same time, living in a time of perpetual economic growth leading to cultural collapse and ecological exhaustion, the Spartan ideal and long-lasting success of a socio-political steady-state perhaps has a new relevance for our time.

By the yardstick of individual freedom, the ledger is perhaps not quite as much in Athens’ favor as one might expect. In every premodern economy, the precious leisure necessary for culture and civic life is necessarily the purview of a select few. Athens no doubt afforded more scope for individual merit, freedom, and political participation to a greater share of the population on the whole. But one also should not forget that democratic Athens itself was based on chattel slavery, subject colonies, and house-bound women. In the Spartan empire, notwithstanding the hard lives of the Helots, women and allied states were generally freer than those of Athens. Furthermore, those who have tasted the monastic life may also suspect that the highly-regimented Spartan lifestyle—the constant training in community life, athletics, and self-restraint—may have offered citizens certain deep satisfactions not available with the liberal lifestyle.

Ironically, Sparta’s greatest failing was precisely in the biological and specifically in the demographic sphere. Sparta, somewhat miraculously, defeated Athens in the Peloponnesian War but fell within decades due to the failure to maintain the population of citizen-soldiers. As Kevin MacDonald observes:

It would appear that the system devised by the Israelite lawgiver [Moses] was in some sense a better strategy for maintaining long-term ethnic coherence than that designed by the Spartan lawgiver, since the Israelite strategy, arguably, continues today (see [The Culture of Critique], ch. 8). The Spartan system was an excellent defensive system, but was ill equipped to administer an empire, and there were no provisions, such as the hereditary Israelite priestly class, that would have allowed it to survive being militarily conquered – a contingency that was all but inevitable in the ancient world and that certainly continues to some extent today.[9]

For MacDonald, “while the group strategy of the ancient Spartans was successful for a significant period, it was ultimately a failure.”[10] In marked contrast with the Jews, who were able to survive through fanatical adherence to a dogmatic ethnocentric religion, the Spartans proved completely incapable of maintaining their identity and group evolutionary strategy in the absence of a supportive sovereign State. In this, the Spartans were sadly typical of Western peoples. There is furthermore little reason to believe that Sparta’s primitive eugenic measures had much positive effect.

We would be wrong to downplay the Spartan achievement however. The other Greeks were greatly impressed by those four centuries of Spartan order and power which were so great a factor in their international affairs. Polybius, a later Hellenistic historian who documented the rise of Rome, gave a balanced summary of the greatness and limits of Sparta through a useful comparison with the Roman Republic. He remarked that “the constitution so framed by Lycurgus preserved independence in Sparta longer than anywhere else in recorded history” (Polybius, 6.10). Furthermore:

The Lycurgan system is designed for the secure maintenance of the status quo and the preservation of autonomy. Those who believe that this is what a state is for must agree that there is not and never has been a better system or constitution than that of the Spartans. But if one has greater ambitions that that – if one thinks that it is a finer and nobler thing to be a world-class leader, with an extensive dominion and empire, the center and focal point of everyone’s world – then one must admit that the Spartan constitution is deficient and the Roman constitution is superior and more dynamic. (Polybius, 6.50)

There is no doubt that there is a tendency to “slouching” in human history: every new generation balks at the unexplained disciplines and traditional rigors inherited from the past. If this rebelling against the past is done for the sake of comfort and pleasure, as opposed to replacing a tradition with new practices because they are more conducive to the public good, we call this decadence. In Sparta alone, the citizens were able to maintain a fearsome degree of virtue, by the authority held by the elders, by the systematic education and training of the citizens, and by the threat posed by the Helots.

The constitution of Lycurgus – with its stability, mixing of elitism and democracy, sovereignty, lawfulness, training, social unity, and sacrifice for the common good – may serve a model for all nations that truly wish to fight to determine their own destiny and adhere to values. The example of Sparta, like Prussia in the modern era, also shows that smallness is no reason for defeatism, that all nations have, with effort, a chance at achieving freedom and greatness. No wonder that the law of Lycurgus and the sacrifice of Leonidas’ 300 Spartans have inspired philosophers and statesmen throughout the ages, even in the face of terrible odds. Given the challenges facing Western and European nations in the twenty-first century – consider the sheer scale of the rising foreign superpowers, ecological threats, and demographic collapse – the Spartan experience in building a lawful, holistic, and biopolitical martial republic may yet help inspire our renewal.


Bibliography

Aristotle (trans. H. C. Lawson-Tancred), The Art of Rhetoric (London: Penguin, 1991).

Cartledge, Paul, Sparta and Lakonia: A Regional History, 1300 to 362 BC (New York: Routledge, 2002).

Herodotus (trans. Robin Waterfield), The Histories (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998).

MacDonald, Kevin, A People That Shall Dwell Alone: Judaism as a Group Evolutionary Strategy, with Diaspora Peoples (Lincoln, Nebraska: Writers Club, 2002).

Plato (ed. John M. Cooper), Complete Works, (Indianapolis, Indian: Hackett, 1997).

Plutarch (trans. Richard Talbert and Ian Scott-Kilvert), On Sparta (London: Penguin, 2005), includes Plutarch’s Life of Lycurgus, Sayings of Spartans, and Sayings of Spartan Women, and Xenophon’s Spartan Constitution.

Polybius (trans. Robin Waterfield), The Histories (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010).

Xenophon (trans. Rex Warner), A History of My Times [Hellenica] (London: Penguin, 1979).

Thucydides (trans. Martin Hammond), The Peloponnesian War (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).


[1]  Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, 4.80. Translation from Paul Cartledge, Sparta and Lakonia: A Regional History, 1300 to 362 BC (New York: Routledge, 2002), Annex 4, p. 299. The passage is somewhat ambiguous. Cartledge also provides an alternative translation: “as far as the Helots are concerned, most Spartan institutions have always been designed with a view to security.”

[2]  Xenophon, Spartan Constitution, 1.

[3]        The Old Oligarch observes:

 For oligarchic cities it is necessary to keep to alliances and oaths. If they do not abide by agreements or if injustice is done, there are the names of the few who made the agreement. But whatever agreements the populace makes can be repudiated by referring the blame to the one who spoke or took the vote, while the others declare that they were absent or did not approve of the agreement made in the full assembly. (The Constitution of the Athenians, 2.18)

[4]        Pericles says: “The Spartans do not invade our land on their own, but they have all their allies with them” (Thu., 2.39). Earlier, Pericles had argued that the Spartans’ need for their allies’ agreement to take decisions would paralyze them:

 In a single pitched battle the Peloponnesians and their allies are capable of resisting the whole of Greece, but they are incapable of maintaining a war against an opposition which differs from them in kind: as long, that is, that they continue without a central deliberative forum, for lack of which they cannot take any immediate decisive action, and as long as all the various tribal groups in a miscellaneous confederacy have equal votes, so each promotes its own concern – a system unlikely to produce any effective results. (Thucydides, 1.141)

This can be taken as an early argument for sovereign central government rather than divided confederal government. Perhaps the need to convince their allies was partly responsible for the supposed timidity and slowness of Spartan foreign policy (Thu., 8.96).

[5]        Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 6.

[6]        Plutarch states that “some . . . claim that devotion to the intellect is more characteristic of Spartans than love of physical exercise” (Lycurgus, 20) and, in a beautiful rhetorical flourish, concludes his Life saying:

 Lycurgus . . . brought into the light of day, not paper theories, but a functioning constitution which is quite unmatched. To those who suspect that it is impracticable for a theoretical structure to be centered upon a Sage, he has exhibited his whole city practicing philosophy” (Lycurgus, 31).

Such passages in Plutarch must be considered idealizations and inspiring exhortations to political philosophy, rather than realistic history.

In his Protagoras, Plato has Socrates ironically claim that “the Spartans have the best education in philosophy and debate” (342e). This is no place for a full commentary on this dialogue. However, given the context, it seems Plato is making a paradoxical and humorous comment praising certain Spartan virtues – namely discretion, Laconic wit, remembrance of wise sayings – as integral to the practice of philosophy. One of the great challenges in studying ancient Greek literature, is determining whether a text is ironic or is making some kind of in-joke. Herodotus, Socrates, Plato, and Xenophon certainly often appealed to ironic humor.

[7]  Whereas Aristotle is here quoting someone else, he was more generally one of the few ancient philosophers to be broadly critical of Sparta, having come of age after its collapse after the Battle of Leuctra. At the same time, Aristotle did admire the communitarian ambitions of the Spartan educational system.

[8]  Xenophon, Hellenica, 5.2.7.

[9]  MacDonald, PSDA, p. 395.

[10] MacDonald, PSDA, p. 8.

 

Swedish Government Poll Shows Populist Party Surge as Migration Issues Take Center Stage

Swedish Government Poll Shows Populist Party Surge as Migration Issues Take Centre Stage

A poll from the Statistics Sweden, the official statistics agency of the Swedish state, shows a solid increase in support for the populist Sweden Democrats (SD) as mass migration issues come to the forefront of the election campaign.

The poll, which was released Tuesday, shows the anti-mass migration party increase their support by 3.7 per cent to a total of 18.5 per cent, while the ruling Social Democrats have slipped 4.3 per cent to 28.3 per cent, Swedish broadcaster SVT reports.

“There are very strong numbers in this measurement. Historically, we usually measure ourselves quite badly. This confirms the trend, we are growing right now, and the Social Democrats are decreasing,” said the leader of the Sweden Democrats Jimmie Åkesson.

The SD leader has seen a surge in support following a leaders’ debate last month which focused on four key election issues including law and order and immigration – subjects which Åkesson dominated according to polling taken after the debate.

Some, like Swedish journalist Fredrik Furtenbach, have credited the rise in support for the SD to the prevalence of mass migration in both debates and in the news cycle.

“SD has risen in the spring and I think it’s about how much people are talking about migration – how much migration dominates the political debate,” Furtenbach said.

While calling the poll a “high-quality measurement”, Furtenbach added that the election was still several months away and added: “We know from other measurements that the majority of voters have not decided who to vote for.”

While the poll shows the SD well behind the Social Democrats, other polls have shown very different results. Last month a YouGov poll put the SD neck and neck with the ruling party at 23 per cent.

Many of the SD’s supporters are also from younger demographics with the party being the most popular with voters between the ages of 18 and 34.

Supreme Court Anal Cake Decision: Faggots Lose! Jesus Wins!

Andrew Anglin
Daily Stormer
June 5, 2018

Aaaaaaaaaaaand we’ve got a real Supreme Court again!

Freedom of association restored in America!

Well.

Not quite.

But faggots BTFO either way.

New York Times:

The Supreme Court on Monday ruled in favor of a Colorado baker who had refused to create a wedding cake for a gay couple. The court’s decision was narrow, and it left open the larger question of whether a business can discriminate against gay men and lesbians based on rights protected by the First Amendment.

The court passed on an opportunity to either bolster the right to same-sex marriage or explain how far the government can go in regulating businesses run on religious principles. Instead, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy’s majority opinion turned on the argument that the Colorado Civil Rights Commission, which originally ruled against the baker, had been shown to be hostile to religion because of the remarks of one of its members.

At the same time, Justice Kennedy strongly reaffirmed protections for gay rights.

“The outcome of cases like this in other circumstances must await further elaboration in the courts,” he wrote, “all in the context of recognizing that these disputes must be resolved with tolerance, without undue disrespect to sincere religious beliefs, and without subjecting gay persons to indignities when they seek goods and services in an open market.”

Justice Kennedy often casts the deciding vote in closely divided cases on major social issues. When the court agreed to hear the Colorado case last June, it seemed to present him with a stark choice between two of his core commitments. On the one hand, Justice Kennedy has written every major Supreme Court decision protecting gay men and lesbians. On the other, he is the court’s most ardent defender of free speech.

On Monday, Justice Kennedy chose a third path, one that seemed to apply only to the case before the court.

Writing for the majority in the 7-to-2 decision, he said the Civil Rights Commission’s ruling against the baker, Jack Phillips, had been infected by religious animus. He cited what he said were “inappropriate and dismissive comments” from one commissioner in saying that the panel had acted inappropriately and that its decision should be overturned.

“The neutral and respectful consideration to which Phillips was entitled was compromised here,” Justice Kennedy wrote. “The Civil Rights Commission’s treatment of his case has some elements of a clear and impermissible hostility toward the sincere religious beliefs that motivated his objection.”

Yeah, so it’s not the ultimate win.

I’m not a lawyer, but basically this case was set to remove all civil rights protections from faggots, because it either means they have identity-based “civil rights” – which means forcing people to do business with them, like the blacks can do – or they don’t.

Kennedy used a loophole here. Which might mean that they are going to get another gay cake, or some other gay marriage case. They’re deciding right now whether or not to hear a gay wedding flowers case.

 

So, we’re a long way from going full-Russia.

Or full-Iran.

But hey – a win is a win is a win, and the faggots and faggot-lovers looking at this won’t be looking at the nuance of the decision.

They’ll just be looking at the fact that the winning streak of sick homosexual perverts just ended.

So it’s worth celebrating.

For sure.

Aryan Origin

By Ron McVan

In man’s analysis of understanding of himself, it is as well to know whence he came as whither he is going.” ~ Edgar Cayce

The dawn of man’s history follows on the twilight of a preceding history of man. The birth and death of a complete history of mankind is not unlike civilizations themselves, or, the cycle of man’s own physical body. It is said that a man’s life consists of twelve seven-year cycles, which in the final state of decline is extinguished by the inevitable process of physical death. A history of mankind is extinguished by a cyclic death as well, which comes in the form of a natural, or in some cases unnatural, catastrophe. This is a period upon which all previous knowledge is extinguished and scrubbed clean with perchance a few mysterious remaining vestiges left behind. When man is born he at first has very little, if any, remembrance of his past lives, due primarily to the fact that he has a new brain. There are fortunate few who retain the ability to accurately remember their past life through flashes of blood memory or psychic ability.

All men and women living today, whether they care to admit it or not, possess an anxious feeling within themselves, a feeling of impending doom concerning mankind and the planet upon which we chart our daily lives. We feel this way because we have been through it all before in a previous life, perhaps in a far distant prehistoric civilization. Our short memories can insulate us from the immediate potential dangers beneath our feet, as long as we choose to ignore the hot, bubbling reality below the earth’s crust, or the hurling random matter, ever moving precariously through space. The fact that we are alive and conscious in our world at this very moment is not just phenomenal, it is an absolute miracle! The entire Planet Earth has the potential to blow apart at any given time; whole continents can at any moment sink beneath the ocean, or rip in half from a violent axis shift caused by sliding polar ice. A leading scientist in underground nuclear testing stated that we are just a few more underground nuclear explosions away from splitting the entire planet apart. Even the slightest rise in the ocean level or temperature change, could extinguish all human life. We blot these many variable looming potential catastrophes out of our mind, but we shall never erase the reality that such dreadful occurrences have happened before and they ‘will’ happen again.

The short ten thousand years of our recorded history are barely enough time for a significant upgrading of mankind, yet it would be laughable to say that we are now living in a pinnacle Golden Age of human development. Our great forefathers who built the magnificent civilizations and wonders of our historical past would recoil in disgust at what we have become after such glorious and noble beginnings. We have not devolved spiritually and academically as well and abuse and violate Nature and this planet with utter impunity! Many geneticists believe that civilization itself causes the human stock to slowly degenerate, not only from its obvious artificial, unnatural and unhealthy habitat but also by enabling persons with unfavorable mutations to live and breed—when in a wild natural state, they would quickly perish. Not only do many Aryans today not consider themselves Aryan, most do not even have a clue that the very word itself signifies their unique biological species among the races of mankind. All books throughout history have always referred to the White Race as Aryans up until about the mid 1970’s when all the craftily fabricated anti-White Race shame stigma really kicked into gear. Aryan families have progressively been producing less and less children, falling victim to government forced integration and immigration and increasing non-Aryan adoptions highly encouraged by the media and Christian churches, while the silent genocide, abortion and birth control pills totally devastate any chance of restoring a balance in the numbers of our people worldwide which only hastens the Aryan race towards total extinction in the very near future.

One of the most poignant scientific discoveries of the 19th century was that which officially traced descent of all Indo-European peoples from that of the Aryans while today the enemies of Aryan-kind work overtime to brainwash our children that Aryans are not a race at all but only a language. The major Aryan tribal branches are roughly five in number: the Greeks, the Latins, the Celts, the Teutons, and the Slavs. To understand the origin and evolution of the Aryan Tribes, one must know something about the reasons for their major emigrations. To do this we must return to the last great cataclysmic events that changed the geography of the world. This was the time of the great migration of the races, a time when whole continents sank, and once temperate living areas in the world became lost and all but forgotten under the sea or lost beneath polar icecaps. Let us begin with one of the great civilizations of the former historical era, which was the mystical and never to be forgotten continent of Atlantis, for it was from the survivors of that great cataclysmic catastrophe (circa) 11,600 years ago that our current Western World received the light of highest knowledge and wisdom that would produce the new Golden Era and the Seven Wonders of the World.

One can only imagine the awesome horror of witnessing the sinking of an entire continent. It is, also, only natural that the few who did survive would be inclined to migrate as far away from such a nightmarish geological havoc as fast as their legs or boats could carry them. These Aryan Tribes would later become referred to as Indo-Europeans, traveling and settling to the far reaches of the East and South. Traveling to the West Americas was impossible at that time as today what we know as the Atlantic Ocean was a literal ocean of mud and not navigable for centuries thereafter. A more in-depth study of Atlantis and its most recent scientific facts and findings can be found in the book, “Atlantis The Eighth Continent” by Charles Berlitz, or, “The Secret of Atlantis” by Otto Muck.

At the beginning of our new historical era, Atlantis was gone, but not forgotten. It survived in memory of the Aryan Tribes by many assorted names. Along the north coast of Africa it was referred to by ancient writers as Atlantes, Atarantes and Atlantioi. Carthaginian seafarers knew it as Antilla. The Welsh and English named this lost paradise Avalon. The Basques, who still believe themselves to be direct descendants of Atlantis, called it Atlantika, the Portuguese, Atlántida, the Spanish Atalaya. The Babylonians called the Western paradise Arallu. Found upon Egyptian hieroglyphs are exhibited major sea battles with the Atlanteans, whom they referred to as “the Amenti, from the paradise of the West abode of the dead and part of the divine sun boat.” The ancient Arabians referred to Atlantis as the Land of Ad. It may well be that the name of the new man in the Christian bible, Ad-am, was a derivative of the two. Notice in the word Amenti the name Amen, which seems more than coincidence that the first Egyptian Aryan god would be named Amen Ra. Christians today still end their prayers with the word Amen, most all of whom are unaware that they are still paying their respects to Amen Ra and likely to Atlantis as well. This is the way in which many names are originated. For instance, the Jews call their nation Israel, which is the combined name of three gods: Isis, Ra, and El.

Throughout Mexico and Central America we continue to find remnants of Atlantean memory in names such as Tlapallan, Tollan, Azatlan and Aztlan. Further down in South America, Conquistadores in Venezuela found a settlement called Atlan, peopled by what they referred to as “White Indians”. Early explorers in Wisconsin USA, found a fortified village near Lake Michigan which its inhabitants called Azatlan.

The Vikings believed that Atili was a wondrous land in the West, and it was there that the Teutonic races placed Valhalla, a mystic land of self-renewing, battle, drinking and feasting. The Aryans who went eastward after Atlantis submerged settled in Bactria, which is today Central Asia. There was situated, according to the accounts of ancients, a nation called Arii, and a country known as Aria. Here the Aryan god Wotan (pronounced Vo-tahn) is supposed to have come with the Asen from the region of what is today part of Asia. Recent diggings in China have unearthed many tombs containing tall, fair haired Aryans, which adds credence to that mystery in history. The ancient Aryan city of Troy, now a part of Asia Minor, was also said to have distant links with the patriarchal Allfather Wotan.

After the fall of Atlantis the name Wotan surfaced in diverse areas, even as distant as South America. Pedro Corzo, a pilot who sailed up and down the Peruvian coast for years, reported that everywhere in the temples he found wooden or stone statues of a god called Guaton. The name means ‘whirlwind’, an equivalent to the Teutonic name Wotan, also known as a god of ‘storm’, and the Maya called him Votan, or Quetzalcoatal and Kukulcan, all were known as fair haired, blue eyed, and of White complexion, bearing striking similarities and impact throughout the leading centers of civilization at the time. It is the belief of some scholars that historically, Hermes and Wotan are both one and the same entity, perhaps all three in one, if we add Quetzalcoatal. It seems apparent that some singular individual or perhaps several highly intelligent beings were spreading the high science and technology of Atlantis around and construction of pyramids after the deluge and setting up the beginnings of the new great civilizations to come.

Aryan spiritualism has been primarily solar based. This idea of never dying fire is surely the oldest form of the religions of the Aryan Race. The early tribes who settled in Italy introduced the vesta fire cults there, further exampled in the mythos of Prometheus. The winged solar disk was a trademark symbol of the early Aryan civilizations. Aryans were always warlike, just as the gods they worshiped, as well as agricultural; above all they possessed the divine gifts of artistic creativity, high intellect and ingenuity.

The name Aryan is derived from the Indo-European Sanskrit language and means noble. “Aryan” is the correct actual name that defines the biological origins of what most people mistakenly refer to as the White Race. White is a color, not a name that defines a species, European is simply a name of a place, not a species. The name European in its origin started with the goddess Europa. Most are familiar with the mythological story of Europa and the Bull. Caucasian, likewise does not define a species, it is derived from the word Caucus which is the name of a place or region in the Caucus mountains. It is much like calling ourselves “Americans” as a race and just as ludicrous, neither name defines a species, they are merely the names of a geographical place. The word “Gentile” is of Jewish biblical origin and is used to signify those who are non-Jews. Again not the race defining name of a specific genetic human species.

The Aryan Race has always had a tendency to divide itself up into nations and make the quite common mistake in proclaiming that such nations are who and what we are as a race. It is no different than an Aryan in California stating that he is a different people than the Aryans who live in New York. Ask any Aryan today what race they are and they will name off some of the nations in Europe or worse, say that they are “Heinz 57”, which is to say, a little bit of everything. Someone says that they are German, French and Scandinavian. What does that mean genetically? All are Teutonic tribal branch names but they are all Aryan as a species.

There are only two primary root tribes of Aryans in Europe, the Celts and the Teutons, all other tribes of Aryans are a derivative of those two. It is certainly not the place called Europe which has made the Aryans what they have become over the many centuries of our history. We were Aryans before we settled there and this we owe simply too far distant root origins and the far-reaching influence of the migratory period after the fall of Atlantis, which hardened our people and developed the hearty and viril character of our ancestors. It is not to say that all Aryans were bottled up in the area of Atlantis alone before the great cataclysm, Hyperborea and ancient Aryan Egypt co-existed with Atlantis and likewise there were many tribes of our people spread far and wide in between. There remains Egyptian hieroglyphs that depict great naval battles between the Atlanteans and the Egyptians. In fact both were in the midst of a fierce battle with one another the day that Atlantis was submerged which we have now learned was the result of an asteroid striking the earth in the region of the Sargasso sea. What serves as a testament to the distant age of Egypt is that it survived the last great flood and axis shift. There still exists salt water tide marks on the interior of the pyramid of Giza which is not even the oldest pyramid. The Sphinx itself is far older than the pyramids in Egypt. Look at the globe of the world and you will see that the Nile river is the only river which has its delta pointing towards the north, That it survived the last axis shift is also evident in that upper Egypt is still called lower Egypt and lower Egypt is still called upper Egypt.

How was the Indo-European evolved from the Aryan? He certainly left his home a different man from what he had become when he set foot on European soil—at the time when he first made his appearance in history. Nor is he invariably the same. The Greek differs from the Roman, the Roman from the Celt, the Celt from the Teuton, the Teuton from the Slav. Yet, one bonding genetic element runs through all Aryan Tribes, which defines them back to the original source. It is genetic physiognomy which defines the Aryan species, not the language or temporary political boundaries, or language which many are taught to believe from today’s Aryan culture distorters. A race is not to be determined by skin color alone, it is genetic, it is the defining DNA of a specific race of humankind. There are Aryans of light, medium and dark skin complexions. There are Chinese of skin color ranging from yellowish skin to pure white skin. Negroes can range from darkest black skin to brown, tan and in some cases pure white albino Negroes. Indians skin color can vary from reddish complexion to tan, white or to darkest black as in East Indian species from India. The Indians from the America’s it has been found co-existed with the Aryans during the age of Atlantis. The name “Indian” was not the original name used to define their race, they were all known in those days of Atlantis as Toltec’s.

Above all, a man’s conduct is clearly the result of his character and the circumstances that surround his action. His character is the product of his past environment (back to his conception) and his heredity. ‘We are the tail-end of a tape-worm of ancestry.’ We originate nothing and we decide nothing; we are moved, directed, and compelled by forces ultimately external to us, and over which, in the last analysis, we have no control. Choice is a delusion; it is only a composition of determining forces. ‘Men think themselves free because they are conscious of their volitions and desires, but are ignorant of the causes by which they are led to wish and desire. In truth our behavior is as rigidly determined by the forces that produce and encompass us, as the fall of a stone is fixed in time and space by its mass, its velocity, and its direction. It is in this sense that man is a machine.” ~ Will Durant

The entire condition of present day Aryan culture is seriously ill and degenerating in an alarming manner. Having come under the custody of men who are inwardly indifferent, self hating and even hostile to it, and whose mental and moral attitude differs drastically from our noble race-conscious forebears. At this juncture in history Aryan man is fighting for the battle of his life, with the ever-present specter of impending extinction of his entire species hanging in the balance before him. In a report by the United States Immigration Commission dated 1911, it states that: “The Aryan ‘races’ comprise nearly half the population of the Earth, say 700,000,000 out of a total of 1,500,000,000.” In less than one century, the Aryan Race has dwindled to a most shocking 8% of the World population and still rapidly declining, while the world population has more than quadrupled, now in excess of 6 billion. A front page article in a national periodical back in 1960 stated, “It is one of the riddles of our time why the White man, lord of the earth from pole to pole, should, in the short space of a single human generation, renounce his rule, draw back wearily from a position of world-wide power, so that today he is in a panic-stricken flight, where yesterday he still governed inviolably.”

If the Aryan Race does not regain control of its survival instincts, then certain extinction from the face of the Earth within a space of one century but perhaps more likely 50 years is inevitable. The battle that must be faced is not from any enemy without, but from the enemy within our own self and our people. That special something which made our ancestors the literal sovereigns of the earth, developed from an indigenous inborn yearning in our DNA. It is this yearning that builds uncommon valor, makes men take chances and risk their lives and limbs for the greater glory of their people. Such a yearning has always been a genetic characteristic of Aryan man, matched with an indomitable will and biological determination. This yearning is perhaps more accurately defined as “The Vital Spark”.

The Aryan Race certainly has never been submissive in the past, which is why it has reigned supreme in might and creative genius since the dawn of history. Should it fully adopt the submissive, turn-the-other-cheek, resist-not-evil, all-men-are-created-equal pabulum of alien Semitic Christian dogma, (which the Semites themselves would never follow) or the universalist and self-hating ‘anything goes’ concept, then we shall perish from the face of the earth, surely as the sun sets in the west! Jewish religion and history works fine for the Jews, but it is not our religion, nor is it our history or Aryan heroes. We shall never find the path to our race ethnic soul and indigenous spirituality by following a Jewish road-map or any path or system which is not our own. Only the dare to be strong and great as a people, dare to be vigilant against all odds for the right and honor of your family, culture and race will be capable of finding their own true inner essence. The inner strength of our roots and identity as a proud and glorious race is what filled our ancestors with the Vital Spark to produce the Wonders of the World! The Alfa Aryan must ever remain thick-skinned to bear his or her steadfast non-conformity to the maddening and unconscious world which is always ready to pull us down into the mire at the first opportunity. Always remember that from the grinding, grating friction within the oyster comes the pearl. There is no growth without adversity, and there is no life worth the living without your ethnic roots, heritage, and indigenous mythology which bears your identity and the treasure of your Vital Spark, your Will to Be, which is your God given Quest and Holy Grail by divine right!

Our culture is superficial today, and our knowledge dangerous, because we are rich in mechanisms and poor in purposes. The balance of mind which once came of a warm religious faith is gone; science has taken from us the supernatural bases of our mortality, and all the world seems consumed in a disorderly individualism that reflects the chaotic fragmentation of our character.” ~ Will Durant

The Bizarre Lies Told At Nuremberg To Execute Germans They Wish You’d Forget

The Bizarre Lies Told At Nuremberg To Execute Germans They Wish You’d Forget

From Wear’s War

…many of the charges made at Nuremberg are so bizarre that most defenders of the Holocaust story have long since let them lapse”.

After Germany’s defeat in WWII, the Nuremberg and later trials were organized primarily for political purposes rather than to dispense impartial justice. Wears War brings to you each week a quote from the many fine men and women who were openly appalled by the trials. All of these people were highly respected and prominent in their field, at least until they spoke out against the trials.

Healthy Inmates Celebrate Liberation With Alcohol, Buchenwald, 1945

Many defenders of the Holocaust story maintain that the 42-volume Trial of the Major War Criminals (The Blue Series) supplies a massive compilation of damning evidence against Germany’s National Socialist regime. In his book Made in Russia: The Holocaust, Carlos Porter confronts the evidence directly by reproducing page after page from the Blue Series. Porter shows that many of the charges made at Nuremberg are so bizarre that most defenders of the Holocaust story have long since let them lapse. In addition to killing Jews in homicidal gas chambers, the Germans at Nuremberg were accused of:

–building special electrical appliances to zap inmates to death with mass electrical shocks;

–killing 20,000 Jews in a village near Auschwitz with an atomic bomb;

–forcing prisoners to climb trees and then killing the prisoners by cutting down the trees;

–killing 840,000 Russian prisoners at the Sachsenhausen concentration camp using a pedal-driven brain-bashing machine, and then burning the bodies in four mobile crematories;

–torturing and executing people at the Yanov camp in Russia in time to musiccreated by a special orchestra selected from among the prisoners, and then shooting every member of the orchestra;

grinding the bones of 200 people at one time as described in documents and photographs that have disappeared;

making lampshades, handbags, driving gloves for SS officers, book bindings, saddles, house slippers, etc. out of human skin;

–killing prisoners and concentration camp inmates for everything from having soiled underwear to having armpit hair; and

steaming people to death like lobsters in steam chambers at Treblinka.

After this incredible survey of Nuremberg atrocity evidence, Carlos Porter provides numerous examples of improper prosecution tactics at Nuremberg. The defendants at Nuremberg were rarely able to confront their accusers, since affidavits from witnesses who had been deposed months before sufficed. The prosecution made it difficult for the defense lawyers to have timely access to the documents introduced into evidence by the prosecution. Also, photocopies and transcripts were usually submitted into evidence instead of the original German documents, which in many cases seemed to have disappeared. Finally, the defense had access only to those documents which the prosecution considered material to the case. The defense had no right to review the tons of remaining documents that might help them defend their clients.

American soldiers with deloused clothing airing outside the dis-infestation chambers, 1945. The dis-infestation chambers and Zyklon-B continued to be used after the Allied liberation of the camp, something that the Holocaust storytellers always neglect to tell.

Quote Source: Porter, Carlos Whitlock, Made in Russia: The Holocaust, Historical Review Press, 1988.

Repeat After Me: “The Nuremberg Trials Dispensed Fair & Objective Justice For The Greater Good Of Humanity!”
Decades Later Americans Pay To Administer Reparation Agreements: “…the State Department has waived ‘quite considerable’ administrative costs”. After Survivors Interfered In U.S. State & Federal Contract Tenders In 2016. Repeat After Me: “The Nuremberg Trials Dispensed Fair & Objective Justice For The Greater GUILT Of Humanity!”
The Book That Requires Trolls On A Salary To Attempt To Discredit It.